Young Children in Foster Care

This series is a collaboration between the Early Trauma Treatment Network (ETTN) and the NCTSN Zero to Six Collaborative Group. It is aimed at addressing the complex issues and critical needs surrounding young traumatized children in the child welfare system and those who care for them. Infants’ and toddlers’ unique needs within the child welfare system often do not receive adequate attention. Within a trauma-informed framework, this webinar series will review a variety of issues relevant to very young children, their caregivers, and the individuals and systems charged with supporting their recovery from abuse and neglect.

Presenters discuss the many transitions experienced byand the challenges transitions pose foryoung traumatized children in the child welfare system. Whether responding to the transition from the biological parents' home to a foster home, from foster home to foster home, or the changes accompanying reunification, those working in the child welfare system will benefit from understanding the effects of these transitions and the appropriate methods for facilitating them.
Presenters address the important role visitation plays for young foster children and their caregivers and discuss ways to organize and improve the visit experience. Participants will learn methods for transforming visitation from a frustrating to a therapeutic experience, including ways to manage children's behavior during and after the visit.
Presenters discuss the importance of identifying and implementing effective strategies for self-care in dealing with the emotional challenges of working with infants, young children, and their caregivers who have been traumatized.
Presenters address providing or referring infants, young children, and their caregivers for trauma-sensitive therapeutic interventions, including Child Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) and Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-Up (ABC).
Presenters address the importance of understanding the special developmental needs of young traumatized children. They discuss appropriate referrals for consultation, and describe a cutting edge developmental intervention for children in the child welfare system.
Presenters introduce core concepts for enhancing diversity-informed practice and present vignettes to highlight how each core concept can be applied to child welfare practice.
Presenters address attachment and its implications for young traumatized children in the child welfare system and discuss the nature of typically developing attachment relationships as well as the impact of trauma and maltreatment on such relationships. Speakers also focus on specific ways to encourage the maintenance and development of attachment relationships as well as the implications of attachment disorders.
Presenters discuss the unique characteristics of young children in foster care as they recover from abuse and neglect and suggest considerations for caregivers and the individuals and systems charged with their care.
Presenters discuss the impact of trauma and the experience of young children in the child welfare system and the signs, symptoms, and consequences of trauma in infants, young children, and their caregivers.